Writing Challenge #11

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WEEKLY CHALLENGE #11

  1. WRITE: This week’s challenge is by special request from Rebecca Braun! If you have an idea for a challenge, email and let us know. We may just use it in the future…

Write a nonnet! A nonnet has nine lines. The first nine has nine syllables. The second has eight. The third has seven, on and on until you hit the ninth line that has one syllable. It can be any topic.

COMMENT: You MUST comment on FOUR other entries to qualify. If you do not, your entry will be disqualified from the challenge. Give and take… Keep the cycle going.

IMPORTANT In order to qualify, you MUST vote for your TOP TWO choices. If you don’t vote, you cannot win this challenge (even if you receive the most votes!). To vote, you need to reply to the email that goes out for the Weekly Challenges. In that email, if you scroll to the bottom, you will see all the information you need to vote for this challenge.You must join our mailing list in order to receive the weekly voting email. 

DEADLINE: Tuesday, June 7th at 11:59 p.m. PST. Voting booth will open for this challenge on Wednesday, June 8th, and the winners will be announced the following Wednesday, June 15th.

CONGRATULATIONS: To the winners of Challenge #9… Marica Yearwood, Doug Langille and Valerie Brown!

THIS CHALLENGE IS OPEN TO ALL MEMBERS!

Have fun!


Author Notes

102 Comments for “Writing Challenge #11”

Joy Kettren

says:

I received a rejection letter
Dejected, I swore off writing
Lasted an entire week, then
I entered this challenge
to redeem myself
in some small way
Get back on
the horse
Stay

says:

It’s seldom truly about acceptance or rejection. If you need to write, you must write! Don’t ever judge yourself harshly when getting a rejection letter. Just send it off somewhere else. I have read so many stories about famous and not-so-famous writers receiving rejection letters. Sometimes, we send our stuff out and it just isn’t the right genre for the venue we chose to submit. Sometimes, it just needs some tweaking. Sometimes, another publisher will love what someone else thinks doesn’t meet the bar. You GO, Girl! And don’t let anyone squelch your love to write.

Great Nonnet!

Thanks for joining us on WC. 🙂
Write On!
Becky

Joy Kettren

says:

LOL! Thanks for the support, Rebecca. I’m actually okay with rejections. They can help us see issues or areas to work on that we may not have noticed before. I have a pretty good percentage of acceptances, and it’s all just part of the poet experience. It still gives me, at least, a little “ouch” moment to get one, though.

says:

One, two, three, here we go, oh no
up, up, up, down, down, down, oh
choke and puke, belly up
oh, no, not again
up and around
ferris wheel
oh no
ack

Okay, this is seriously lame, but I think the syllables are correct.

says:

Hi Nancy. I have to go over my lesson on syllables again before I can comment on the numbers. lol. This was not lame as you say but the last line got me. “ack”
In line1 is three two syllabus?

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Nancy, this made me laugh. Mostly because it’s a perfect picture of me on one of those blasted contraptions. Nicely done!!

says:

Well done very funny I thought of someone after a big night on the booze. One hiccup though Nancy your syllable count is fine from 8 down to 1 but the nonnet has nine lines. You just need to add a first line with nine syllables to this and it will be fine cheers

says:

This seriously made me laugh out loud…lol Thanks for the belly laugh to start my day. You just need to add a first line with 9 syllables. No matter. It is totally fun!

Write On!
Becky

Cynthia Baker

says:

It was the first time that I saw you
You shook my hand, it gave me chills
We were drawn to each other
You asked for my number
We stayed up all night
I won’t forget
How you stole
My heart
Josh

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Very romantic. Sounds like Josh did his job well. 🙂 Always a good thing when that happens.

Well done!

says:

Just laying there on that bed sure to fly.
Gaunt, weak, yet aware you will soon die.
You wink a smile to bring me cheer.
Defying fear you just lay there.
You had nothing to say
Simply you just laid.
And you felt me
Then left
Death!

says:

A great piece Claudine very thought provoking. I think lines 3 and 4 both have 8 syllables though which has thrown off your ending you go from 4 syllables at line seven to two syllables at line eight. A very nice piece though and a couple of easy fixes if my syllable count is correct of course. Cheers Craig

says:

Thank you Craig. I had fun trying to fix it.
I believe I was too excited when I wrote this. Lol.
Dont know how to edit from here. So I might have to repost somewhere else

says:

That would be great Claudine this is just an example to play with
Laying there on that bed sure to fly.
Gaunt, weak, yet aware soon to die.
Your wink sent to bring me cheer.
Defying fear you stay.
Nothing do you say.
Simply you lay.
You felt me.
Then left.
Death!

says:

Normally, I would point to the overuse of the word “lay”. But, in this case, it continues to drive the input home. That picture of a loved one on the brink of death, and they can do no more. Stark, sober, reality. This is a very powerful poem. Tighten up the syllables for the challenge, if you wish, but keep this draft. Nice work, Claudine. 🙂

Write On!
Becky

says:

Hi Rebecca.
Thank you for reading. How can I change or tighten up the nonnett after I have posted it already. I think I have fixed it but how do I repost it. Should I just consider it as a great fun experience, which it truly is.

says:

Just repost it in the comment box underneath your original post, if you want to. Explain your syllable count was off, and please consider this for your challenge entry. We are a loosely understandable, easy-going crowd. It is all about the experience, too. Trying new things and experimenting with the prompts. Don’t sweat it!

Tim Hillebrant

says:

I liked this, Claudine. I think the dying often know it’s the living who need the comforts, for the dying know they’re soon to be in a better place.

Well done!

says:

As you guys are enering summer in the northern climes here is my less than a tribute to summer as it is my least favourite season.

Glorious summer fearsome it is
The heat bears down with all it’s might
Natures oven set on high
Tarred roads begin to melt
Life on hold for now
Unbearable
Relentless
Summer
Heat

says:

Minnesota gets mighty humid, hot, and sticky come July and August. Not looking forward to it. You describe it perfectly, Craig. Summer swelter, Nonnet style!

Write On!
Becky

Tim Hillebrant

says:

I’m with you on this one, Craig! Well, at least for the hottest parts of Summer, when the roads get so hot you can cook a meal just by putting your pan on the hot street.

Nicely done, sir!

Joy Kettren

says:

Perfect description of this last weekend in Florida. Can see the heat waves coming off the street. Nicely done.

Lisa Doesburg

says:

Walking through a field of blue flowers,
breathtakingly lovely, God’s gift.
Breathing deep, fragrant delight,
eye candy for the soul,
butterfly heaven.
Treading softly.
Earth’s bounty.
Thank you,
God.

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Love

One moment in time, two hearts captured
Passing glances, conversations
Leading to quiet moments
Feelings grow with time shared
The sweet soft first kiss
Two hearts as one
Lost in time
Just us
Love

says:

I’m melting into a pile of goo from your sweet words, Tim. You certainly have a knack for describing sweet perfect love… Gotta find me some of that! Excellent Nonnet!

Write On!
Becky

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Aww, Thanks, Becky! I appreciate your kind words.

Excellent idea suggesting the Nonnet. I love this form!

says:

Job

Bones and little pinkies, fingers, crunch
Neck and spine repeat their motion
Feet on concrete cry in pain
Twist and turn, do again
Recapitulate
Repetition
Turn and twist
Lifting
Work

Joy Kettren

says:

Good descriptors and alliteration. Could feel the drudgery. Good job!

says:

Thank you, Joy. 🙂 It can really take a toll on your body. You do get lost in the rhythm of it all and forget about the pain while you’re doing it. But after the work is done. Ouch. lol

Carol Moore

says:

Grasp life with your mighty grip for yourself
life is but a bowl of cherries
with piles of rock hard pits
I’m lost in the grip of them
will I find my way out
will I be crossed
only one knows
the holy one
God

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Well Done, Carol!

I like the allegory of fruit as being life- the sweet part and the stones, life has both- but it all turns out in the end. Hopefully.

Tim

Lisa Doesburg

says:

Your count is a little off, Carol, but the poem is inspirational.

Carol Moore

says:

Syllable Counter is bad if my count is off I used it lol 🙂

says:

You actually have a syllable counter, Carol? On your word processing program? I count the syllables out on my fingers, like a million times!!! Haha!

says:

Hi Carol I like your subject here well done however I do think your syllable counter let you down. To help out here is the count I got.
Line 1, 10 syllables
Line 2, 8 syllables
Line 3, 6 syllables
Line 4, 7 syllables. So lines 3 and 4 can just be swapped around without affecting the overall poem.
Line 5, 6 syllables
Line 6, 4 syllables
Line 7, 4 syllables
Line 8, 4 syllables
Line 9, 1 syllable
My syllable count could be out as well as we need to take into consideration local pronunciation such as here in oz we tend to cut words down a lot. Anyway this is just meant to help you out if you want to tackle the style again. If you like we can go over it in more depth in the status updates. Cheers Craig

says:

No matter what the syllable count, it is a wonderful poem, Carol. It reflects a life fully lived, the hardships, life is tough. But God is there, and hope shines through. The first line captured me right away, and I love it. “Grasp life with your mighty grip for yourself”. Powerful truth.

Write On!
Becky

Carol Moore

says:

http://www.wordcalc.com I used this and I still get the same count lol

says:

How do you get syllable count per line with this tool? I couldn’t figure it out. Only the overall syllables in the text. It seems to be more of a word counter than a syllable counter for poetry or per line.

I think I will just keep counting on my fingers!

says:

Ok. I had to figure this out. I made each line a sentence, and then ran the counter. It did display the syllable counts on all sentences. It did say each line had the proper amount of syllables for the Nonnet. It was wrong! lol

The moral of this story… use your fingers!

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