Writing Challenge #10

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WEEKLY CHALLENGE #10

  1. WRITE: The worst day you’ve had… describe it using no more than two sentences. It’s a tough one, but those emotions help us get in touch with our inner writer.

COMMENT: You MUST comment on FOUR other entries to qualify. If you do not, your entry will be disqualified from the challenge. Give and take… Keep the cycle going.

IMPORTANT In order to qualify, you MUST vote for your TOP TWO choices. If you don’t vote, you cannot win this challenge (even if you receive the most votes!). To vote, you need to reply to the email that goes out for the Weekly Challenges. In that email, if you scroll to the bottom, you will see all the information you need to vote for this challenge.You must join our mailing list in order to receive the weekly voting email. 

DEADLINE: Tuesday, May 31st at 11:59 p.m. PST. Voting booth will open for this challenge on Wednesday, June 1st, and the winners will be announced the following Wednesday, June 8th.

CONGRATULATIONS: To the winners of Challenge #8… Tim Hillebrant, Claudine S. and Doug Langille!

THIS CHALLENGE IS OPEN TO ALL MEMBERS!

Have fun!


Author Notes

46 Comments for “Writing Challenge #10”

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Sitting in the waiting room, my family and I stared at the non-moving clock, hoping for some word, any word, from the doctors operating on my Mom. The door opened, and the surgeon came in looking grave as he pulled his mask from his face and said, “The tumor we removed from her brain was bigger than we thought; size of an orange, not an apricot, and we couldn’t get it all.”

says:

I woke up crying, tears already streaming down my face, breath coming out in low moans and wails. The permanence had yet to sink in – a part of me held on to a childlike belief that if I squinted my eyes and wished hard enough, he really wouldn’t be dead…

Carol Moore

says:

In 1985 I was working twelve hours a day and one night I got a phone call from home that my oldest daughter had been molested by a family friend. I came home to my daughter and her sisters and brother being removed from my home because of what happened while I was working.

says:

I paced the kitchen frantically and willed the phone to ring, commanding it to tell me that my world was okay–that Gage was safe. Shadows of blue and red light swept the room and I closed my eyes, waiting for the knock at the door.

says:

“What do you need to go to college for? You’re just going to end up barefoot and pregnant, anyway.”

Carol Moore

says:

I understand this one I had to quit high school in the ninth grade because they didn’t want an unmarried mother going there.

says:

Times were definitely different back then, Carol. Girls who got pregnant in high school often “disappeared” to save others from their shame. My cousin got pregnant when she was a junior in high school. She was allowed to finish school, but there was a “shotgun” wedding, and that didn’t turn out so well for her. I hope you got to finish school!

Lisa Doesburg

says:

That is NOT my funny, witty, beloved baby brother lying there with lifeless eyes in the hospital bed. Not that emaciated, flesh-over-bone, THING that I can’t even recognize.

says:

A low, sinking, stinking feeling came over me as the school counselor went over the facts that would rob me of my inocence and my belief in true love.
Bitterness blinded me, coldness chilled my bones as without warning the marriage of seventeen years ended shamefully.

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