Do You Like to Write Poetry? (Group Discussion)

Poems are one of my favorite things to write. I love the ebb and flow of the words. When I am inspired to write a poem I don’t often think about form, unless that is what I have decided to explore. Free-writing poems is a relaxing activity for me, and I often mix rhyming and non-rhyming sections. I don’t know if intellectual schooled poets would approve of this, but it works for me.

HAIBUN

I do enjoy picking a specific poem form, now and then, and using the rules to guide my words and rhyme scheme. We have been having some fun on Writer’s Carnival exploring the Haibun. This was a new form for me, and I enjoyed it very much, as it mixes formal Haiku sections with prose. There is no set amount of stanzas or prose sections; you are free to design the body of your poem any way you want. (Example: Diamond Brocade by Rebecca Braun)

HAIKU

A basic Haiku uses the form of 3 lines: 5-7-5 is the syllable count for those lines, traditionally evoking images of nature. (I don’t always follow the nature theme, but I like the 5-7-5 form. (Example: Butterfly by Craig Lincoln)

VILLANELLE

Another form I appreciate is the French Villanelle: a nineteen-line poem with two rhymes throughout, consisting of five tercets and a quatrain, with the first and third lines of the opening tercet recurring alternately at the end of the other tercets and with both repeated at the close of the concluding quatrain. (Example: Cats and Skulls by Rebecca Braun)

What is a tercet? A set or group of three lines of verse rhyming together.

What is a quatrain? A stanza of four lines, especially one having alternate rhymes.

SONNET

I find the Sonnet to be a very beautiful form to write. There are many different forms of Sonnets, I have found, but I particularly like the English Shakespearean Sonnet: This form consists of Fourteen lines with each having ten syllables, has a rhyme scheme of abab cdcd efef gg, and uses Iambic pentameter-daDa daDa daDa daDa daDa. The first 8 lines set up conflict, the remaining six lines provide a turning of the initial theme or conflict. Many poems of this style are about love. (Example: Love Lost by Rebecca Braun)

I have shared with you some of my favorite forms of poetry. Most of the examples are mine, and may not reflect the true traditional essence of the form, so research further if you want to know the history and traditional formal aspects of these styles of poetry.

What kind of poetry do you like?

Please, share your favorite forms of poetry either to read or write, and share examples, if you so desire. Comment on your methods of writing poetry.


Author Notes

17 Comments for “Do You Like to Write Poetry? (Group Discussion)”

says:

I write some poetry. I just write whatever. I try to pay attention to pacing, more than form. The rules of poetry confuse me too much. But, I went to a workshop on writing poetry according to numbers. Not sure what it is called. I was amazed to find I liked it. Has anyone ever tried this? If you haven’t, those of you who like to write poetry should give it a try.

You use a date that is important to you, i.e. a birthday, anniversary, etc. ex: maybe your mom’s birthday is Sept. 8, 1927. 9/8/1927. You would list the numbers as lines.
9
8
1
9
2
7
Each line of the poem must have the same number of syllables as the number on the line. Syllables, not words. (although I’ve tried both)

It can be challenging and fun. I may enter one I did in the poetry contest. I will post one in the Posts for Reviews.

I’d be interested to know if anyone else has done any of these.

Lina

says:

I have never heard of this type of poem, but it certainly is interesting! You would get a very unique poem every time. Randomness often brings new ideas, thoughts, and unexpected content to the table. I think this would make a great Weekly Challenge prompt, Lina. Something new and fun to experiment with. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on poetry. 🙂

Becky

says:

You’re welcome. I’ll share some of my poetry soon. I’m still trying to figure out my way around the site. I think I’m signed up for the voting. Doesn’t the email go out today? And when does a new weekly challenge begin?
Lina

says:

You will get an e-mail, probably tomorrow, announcing the new challenge prompt and winners of the previous challenge. You can enter every challenge and do nothing, but if you want to be included in the voting process to get an opportunity to place as a winner you must comment on at least four other entries and vote for your two favorite entries. You can’t vote for yourself. 🙂 All of this is explained in the e-mail you will receive. There are no prizes other than the reward of being chosen by fellow writing members. It is a really great way to challenge yourself to a new prompt and try new exercises to stimulate your writing. Our members really love this weekly challenge. Please, participate by all means! Everyone is invited to enter the challenge.

says:

Thanks. I did do 4 reviews for every post I put on. I just don’t know if they went in the right place, but I can see them. I signed up for the email for the voting. I should be all set once I get the email. Looking forward to more challenges.
Lina

Lisa Doesburg

says:

Great topic! I also love poetry because to me, poetry is painting with words. Most times, I don’t follow any set format or style, i just write it and if it just happens to be a certain style, yay for me! Lol. Mainly, I love setting an emotion or an image for the reader to really see. I have so many favorite poets it’s hard to list, but my favorite is finding an unknown. Great post!

says:

You know, in my mind, Edgar Allen Poe has always struck me as a short story writer of the macabre, things that go bump in the night. I used to read his stories as a kid before bed..not a good idea! I was always scared shitless, but had to read them…lol I forgot how beautiful his poetry is, and you reminding me made me look up a few of his poems. How I love “A Dream Within A Dream”, “The Raven”, and so many more. Thanks for getting me to look these poems up!

I really do think you should dabble in some “dark” poetry, Dave…lol I think you could do it justice.

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Hi Becky,

When I was 13, I won a Young Author’s contest for poetry. It’s something I’ve written for years, and enjoy writing very much. I get lost in the rules of the more complicated forms, but enjoy the simpler forms with rules I can understand very much.
I loved your Haibun, and those posted by others. Makes me want to try the style, see where it goes. Thanks for the discussion- very engaging!

Tim

says:

I agree with Doug a greaa topic for discussion Beck.
I must say the japanerse style poetry fascinates me as so much can be conveyed in so few lines and the art form lends itself to such a wide range of writing it is both structured in some respects but also completely open in other ways quite intriguing to say the least .
The structure of French poetry with it’s rich flowing style and strict requirements makes for some beautiful poetry. My favourite style of poetry is the basic rhyming quatrain which I play about with quite a lot it is easy to manipulate it allows me to communicate so many different ideas and emotions in so many ways.

says:

Great article, Becky. Most of the poetry I write is structured; I’m not so good with freer forms. I love haiku and haibun. However, my favourite to read are verses–rhythmic stanzas with simple rhyming schemes. Robert W. Service is my favourite to read and recite, largely due to my grandfather’s penchant for performing while lit with lemon gin.

says:

Now I have to look-up Robert W. Service! My father often recites poetry. One of his favorites to recite is “The Cremation of Sam McGee”. OMG! I just looked-up this poem and it is by Robert W Service! Hahahaahhahahahahaha! Too funny.

“There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.”

I can almost recite the whole poem myself, as I have heard it so many times.

My father also recited many Robert Frost poems, and others.

Poems that tell stories well are so awesome.

says:

Hi Becky! I’m not a poet, although I love poetry. I don’t have a personal preference as to style, although I’m a huge fan of Shakespeare’s sonnets, and of course, Edgar Allen Poe. Lately, I’ve grown partial to more modern poetry without a set rhythm, or even rhymes at all. There seems to be more of a focus on individual words rather than adding or cutting a word to fit a format. They seem to have more energy and zest. Maybe it’s just me…

In the end, I have a great admiration for poets. They are generally more aware of language, words and imagery, making for more effective writing.

says:

You know, in my mind, Edgar Allen Poe has always struck me as a short story writer of the macabre, things that go bump in the night. I used to read his stories as a kid before bed..not a good idea! I was always scared shitless, but had to read them…lol I forgot how beautiful his poetry is, and you reminding me made me look up a few of his poems. How I love “A Dream Within A Dream”, “The Raven”, and so many more. Thanks for getting me to look these poems up!

I really do think you should dabble in some “dark” poetry, Dave…lol I think you could do it justice.

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