Creative Non-fiction

Hello to all fellow Writers Carnival members!

I am now going to try this as a Group Post as recommended:)

Looking for any assistance from those who have experience in the realm of creative non-fiction.  Any hints you might have or great websites that are recommended?  There is just a plethora of information out on the web, and I’m having a hard time sifting through everything to find the best advice. (I have very little experience in anything other than fiction, but my job is requesting that I take over writing duties due to my “subject matter expertise”…lol)

Thanks to everyone in advance!

L.E.

P.S. If I didn’t do this correctly, please let me know.  Won’t have time to learn all the new ins and outs until after finals in June!


Author Notes

7 Comments for “Creative Non-fiction”

Lauren Gibler

says:

Thanks to everyone for the help! I’m hoping to be able to dive in this week:) I’ll let everyone know any helpful bits I find along the way!

Tim Hillebrant

says:

Hi L.E.,

I like Creative Non-Fiction when it’s done well. I think some of the best stuff out there, is written by writers of one kind or another. Pat McManus is one who might be an exception-he took stories of his youth in northern Idaho, and turned it into a series of best selling books. He used to write for Outdoor Life before he retired. Might be an example to look at.

Hope this helps!
Tim

says:

I haven’t written much creative non-fiction per se; when I do, it’s almost always of a personal bent. I’m thinking of a romance bit and a comedy bit where I took real happenings and structured them with the elements of good storytelling. I think that’s where the creative bit comes to play–finding the elements of story (plot, characterization, conflict, hero) in the subject you’re writing about.

I read recently that regularly journalling one’s day with a storytelling approach hones the skill.

Your post makes me want to dabble in it a bit myself.

Best of luck.

says:

Hi, Lauren. If you’re already working on fiction, creative non-fiction isn’t a big step. If you’re feeling wary about jumping in, I would recommend reading other people’s work. You can find essays or newspaper columnist collections at the bookstore, or eve a blog search can turn up some good examples.

Lauren Gibler

says:

Hey Becky,
Thanks for getting back so quickly! Right now, the majority of my work is pretty straight forward press releases, but they are wanting me to write public interest pieces for the holidays. I like your idea of taking a true thought and letting it flow. I’ll try wrapping my brain around the winter holidays and see if that helps:) (Sort of like a Christmas in July/May…)

Thanks!
L.E.

says:

Ok, so now you must get beyond the facts, and make the writing more meaningful to the reader, eh? Something you could do is brainstorm a list of subjects about the Holidays… Think of happy and troubled things that people experience around the Holidays. Ex. Death of a family member during the holidays, the innocence of children and the joy they show in a present or watching the twinkling lights on a tree, arguing with a spouse about money when having to buy gifts for everyone, The pleasure of making a snow angel in the back yard and the beauty of the the winter season. Think of your past memories from a child’s POV and now as an adult: pick a few memories and just begin writing the facts and allow it to turn into something universally meaningful as you write it.

You might find a lot of joy and reward from this kind of writing!

Good Luck, I know you will find a way. You are a talented writer. ?

Becky

says:

My understanding of creative non-fiction is that of writing about a true incident, but embellishing the facts, deleting or adding things that make the story flow. I know I use it a lot in what I write. I begin with a true thought or incident, and then it turns into something else!

What kind of pieces are you expected to write? Can you be more specific?

Good luck on this new adventure and opportunity!

Write On!
Becky

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